Recent perspectives from the World Socialist Web Site

Samantha Power, US ambassador to the United Nations under Barack Obama, has penned a column in the New York Times advocating the use of “professional gatekeepers” to police public discourse on the Internet.
The American president publicly threatened to unleash a genocidal war, declaring that he was “ready, willing and able” to “totally destroy” North Korea and its 25 million people.
On the eve of the opening session of the UN General Assembly, top US officials have reiterated threats of a “military option” on the Korean peninsula that could lead to nuclear war.
September 14 was the 150th anniversary of the publication of the first volume of Capital by Karl Marx. It marked a turning point in mankind’s intellectual and historical development.
After a quarter century of war, there is hardly a decision made in any of the official institutions of bourgeois power where the military and intelligence agencies do not have the final say.
The moves by the Democrats to stabilize the Trump administration are aimed at creating better conditions for intensifying the assault on the working class and preparing for a major war.
The desperate plight of Rohingya Muslims demonstrates that the US never had the slightest interest in promoting democratic rights in Burma, but cynically exploited the issue to advance its own economic and strategic aims.
Even as the destruction caused by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma is still being tallied, the US political establishment is moving rapidly to push through a massive handout for the corporate and financial elite.
The media has largely blacked out new revelations of the direct role of Saudi Arabia, one of Washington’s closest Mideast allies, in preparing the attacks.
As Hurricane Irma wreaks havoc on Florida, the failure to adequately prepare for the storm and protect those in its path has exposed the irrationality of American capitalism.
In its response to Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Irma and other natural disasters, American capitalism has demonstrated its bankruptcy as a social system.
The comparison of the reckless ratcheting up of tensions on the Korean peninsula to the events that sparked the First World War has gone virtually unreported in the US media.